Around Tokyo Part 2: Tokyo Tower, Meiji Temple, Niigata, Shinjuku, Harajuku, Omotesando Hills, Shibuya, and Disney Resorts

November 23, 2013 § Leave a comment

I am very fortunate to have a good friend living in Tokyo because she and her husband were able to tour me around the famous spots in Tokyo. I listed the spots I’ve visited on the rest of my stay in Japan below.

1. Tokyo Tower

Before the Skytree was built, the Tokyo Tower was one of highest TV towers in Tokyo. I thought that a higher structure such as the Skytree would affect this old tower’s popularity but upon seeing it, I realized that it has its own special appeal that still attract a lot of tourists. Initially, it would remind you of Paris’ Eiffel Tower and consequently, a romantic vibe arises. Up the tower, I saw Tokyo’s shining city lights: blinking reds, colorful LEDs of companies, mellow mood lights from nearby restaurants–the city is so alive and it just engulfed me. I felt like a speck of dust in this huge city, trying to find where the city lights would end on the horizon. Whenever I go on trips, I always take a moment to pause, take it all in, feel the place, and try to keep a strong memory of that feeling in my head. When I was up the Tokyo Tower, I did just that. It’s a pity I wasn’t holding somebody’s hand. Ooops, let’s not get soft.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

2. Disney Resorts Tokyo

My friends and I spent two days in the Disney Resorts because it’s divided into Disneyland and Disney Sea theme parks. We had to move from our Shinjuku hotel to a Disney Hotel, which is a bus ride away from the theme parks. I wasn’t particularly ecstatic about the setup because I didn’t want to spend two days in a theme park. I’m more of a stroll and explore kind of person so I thought two days was a waste. I could have spent that one day just walking around Tokyo. However, the theme park experience wasn’t bad at all. Disney never disappoints, except for Hong Kong (smirk).

Image

We spent our first day at Disneyland. It was neither exceptionally big, nor disappointingly small. It was big enough to tire me out at the end of the day. It’s catered for the younger kids because there’s not a lot of adventure rides that I’d go crazy about. However, it was a good place to take photos and sightsee. A good ride from that part of the park is the Space Mountain (but it made my neck hurt after).

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

 

I enjoyed Disney Sea way better than Disneyland. It had a lot of fun rides/attractions and it featured Agrabah and Atlantis, places from my favorite Disney movies! When I saw Agrabah’s structure, I was literally spazzing while (sort of) forcing my friends to go there right away. Disney Sea was also a lot bigger than Disneyland. It had a big open space for water performances and it looks like a place you’d only see in Europe. I loved it. We took a lot of exciting rides including Indiana Jones, Journey to the Center of the Earth, and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

3. Niigata Prefecture via Bullet Train (Shinkansen)

We also visited the Niigata Prefecture, which is located north of the Tokyo Prefecture. This place is famous for its ski resorts. My friends and I took the Shinkansen/Bullet Train for two hours to arrive there. Doesn’t it look so badass?

Image

It was my first time to touch and play with snow so it was quite an exciting experience as well. In this part of Japan, you would see rural qualities that are absent in Tokyo. I saw traditional houses, low-rise apartments and hotels, traditional restaurants, and small box cars Japanese people love to use.

ImageImageImage

Image

Image

ImageImage

Image

Image

Image

Image

 

4. Meiji Temple

My friend Sashico and her husband, Takehiro, were so kind to take me to the famous Meiji Temple. It’s just around Shibuya area and I was really amazed that a place of such historical value could be in the middle of a very busy city. Before going inside, there’s a washing spot just outside the temple gate. I was told that people who go in should clean their hands first.

Image

Image

We were so lucky to have witnessed a traditional Japanese wedding, which occurred in the temple during our visit. My friend said I was very lucky because for the longest time she’s been in Japan, it’s also her first time to witness such! She told me that traditional Japanese weddings are more expensive than white weddings because the fee for Meiji Temple alone is so expensive. I noticed that the bridal train was relatively smaller than what I would imagine an expensive wedding to be.  I believe this was one of the highlights in my Japan trip because it’s such a rare experience!

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Lucky us, there were two weddings! *Pats myself on the back*

ImageImage

Image

Image

Image

Image

 

Sashico told me that Gindaco has one of the best tasting takoyakis around Tokyo. She didn’t pass the opportunity to buy one for me. I ordered cheese-flavored takoyakis and it was really delicious!

ImageImageImage

5. Harajuku / Takeshita Street

When Sashico told me she’ll take me to Harajuku, I got so excited because I know I could see wierd Japanese fashion there. I’m not particularly a fan of wearing weird fashion pieces but it would be awesome if I saw some Lolita girls or cosplayers. At about 4 in the afternoon, the Takeshita Street was really crowded.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Gotcha!

ImageImage

Image

Image

 

6. Omotesando Hills

One place that I really adored in Tokyo would have to be Omotesando Hills. This road has a wide array of buildings with amazing architecture. Building upon building, you’ll see an engaging appeal that would just make you look and say ‘Ah, now that’s a pretty bulding.’ It’s not a budget friendly place so I wouldn’t even dare spend anything here. It’s just a nice place if you’re into architecture or design.

ImageImage

Image

Image

6. Shibuya

And finally, Shibuya. What can I say? Shibuya is what I’ve always imagined Tokyo to be like. It has the crowd, the LED lights, the squiggly Japanese words on billboards, and malls that I have pictured in my head. This is Tokyo at its busiest. We dropped by Shibuya 109, which is an entire building only for women’s apparell. Crazy, I know!

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

6. Shinjuku

Here are some shots we took while walking around Shinjuku.

Image

Image

Image

Image

7. Chiba University, Chiba Prefecture

Last but not the least, here’s a few shots from Chiba University. After all, it’s the main reason why I went to Tokyo anyway. This was taken just after I presented my conference paper. 🙂 The blooming Cherryblossoms were a great icing on the cake!

Image

Image

Japan is a wonderful place and I wish I could visit again, hopefully with my family. Next time, I would love to visit Kyoto so I could be emerged in the old Japan culture. For people who are planning to visit Japan, I say save up, and enjoy! Arigato gozaimazu!

Advertisements

Around Tokyo Part 1: Tokyo Skytree & Asakusa Area

March 22, 2013 § 2 Comments

It’s been a few days since I’ve arrived from Japan. To be honest, I have a pile of school works to finish before I head back to the Philippines for the Holy week (Spring break!), which is less than a week from now. Despite my ‘busy’ schedule however, I can’t really find myself to do my school tasks simply because I’m not in the mood.  So let’s just say I’m waiting for my good and hardworking mood to stop by. *wink* Usually, when I want to relax, I draw some random illustrations or in some cases (like now), I blog. I just thought I could share some experiences I’ve had when I visited Japan. For this post, I’m going to tell you guys about my day trip to the Tokyo Skytree and Asakusa area.

1. Tokyo Skytree

My friends and I had our first stop at the Tokyo Skytree (東京スカイツリー). It’s the newest and highest television and broadcast tower in Tokyo (beating Tokyo Tower). It is located in the Sumida City Ward, not too far from Asakusa.

IMG_2196

How to get there: (Credits to http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3064.html)

The entrance to the Tokyo Skytree is on the 4th floor of Tokyo Skytree Town, which spans the area between Tokyo Skytree Station (formerly known as Narihirabashi Station) on the Tobu Isesaki Line, and Oshiage Station on the Asakusa Subway Line, Hanzomon Subway Line and Keisei Oshiage Line. Alternatively, it is a 20 minute walk across the Sumida River from Asakusa.

Tokyo Skytree can also be reached by direct buses from Tokyo Station (30 minutes, 500 yen one way, 3 buses/hour), Ueno Station (30 minutes, 200 yen, 4 buses/hour), Tokyo Disney Resort (45-55 minutes, 500 yen, 1 bus/hour) and Haneda Airport (50-70 minutes, 900 yen, 1 bus/hour).

In our case, we took the train from Shinjuku to the Tokyo Skytree Station.

Operating Hours: 8:00 to 22:00; No closing days

Fees: 2000 yen (first observatory), 3000 yen (first and second observatories), A 500 yen service fee is charged for time specific advance reservations.

The Tokyo Skytree has two observation decks, the 350m and the 450m. My friends and I went for the 350 meter high observation deck, or the Tembo deck. It’s composed of 3 floors: the highest floor has huge glass windows for a good 360 degree panoramic view of the city; the middle floor has some shops and restaurants; while the lowest floor has another observation deck with see-through floors.

The 450 meter high observation deck, or the Tembo Gallery is dubbed “The world’s highest skywalk”, with a spiral ramp encircling the upper portion of the tower. At night, you can the light spinning around it. I initially thought it was a spaceship! Unfortunately, I was not able to experience this deck because my friends and I chose to buy tickets for the lower deck. Tokyo Skytree’s height almost doubles that of Macau Tower (The observation deck of which, I’ve also visited), but at 350 meters above the ground, I did not feel so high up as I’ve felt when I was in Macau’s 360 degree cafe. I think it’s because Tokyo’s grounds are filled with high buildings to begin with, while Macau Tower is basically surrounded by flat ground. Also, the elevator that took us to the Tembo deck was so cool. Although it’s not a see-through elevator (that would be cooler!), you could see the speed of travel and the height of the tower you’re passing on a screen. Here are some photos:

ELI_1228

ELI_1236


ELI_1275

ELI_1274

ELI_1241

ELI_1270

ELI_1308

We were so lucky to witness a few Sakura trees blooming because it’s too early at that time. Normally, the Sakura season starts late March to April. For lunch, my friends and I decided to eat in a restaurant nearby the Tokyo Skytree. It’s just around the corner of the street when you turn left from the main exit. It really sucks because I was not able to get the Japanese name of the restaurant. My friends are Taiwanese and they can read Kanji (Chinese characters), so they don’t really need to know how to say the name the Japanese way. In fact, they keep saying Dong-jing in reference to Tokyo. So that’s basically why I don’t know the Japanese name of the shop– I’m not forced to know it. I know, it sucks. Anyway, if any of you can read the Kanji and can tell me what this store’s name is, that would be nice.

ELI_1312

My friend ordered this Tempura set, looks delicious right? (1,200 Yen)ELI_1314

Meanwhile, I ordered Katsudon. Its size is just right for my appetite. (900 Yen)ELI_1317
After our sumptuous lunch, my friends and I decided to walk towards Asakusa area. It’s about 20 minutes away from the Tokyo Skytree. We crossed the Sakurabashi bridge passing over the Sumida-gawa river. The bridge was quite a view in itself too, with its vivid red-colored panels. Can you see the Tokyo Skytree?

IMG_2206

2. Asakusa

After passing the Sakurabashi bridge, we entered the Asakusa area. Here, we were able to see the Asakusa market and Sensoji Temple. Historically, the Asakusa area used to be a site for Kabuki Theaters; it was also some sort of a red light district back in the Edo Period. But even before actually getting to the Asakusa Temple proper, my attention was caught by some Japanese men dressed in some sort of traditional Japanese attire (not the Yukata though) with bands on their forehead and a flat, fabric, ninja-like footwear. It’s no surprise that they would attract some attention because they’re quite loud for regular Japanese passers by. Later on, I realized that they were calling for customers to ride their rickshaw tour service. It’s a 30-minute Asakusa tour while riding the rickshaw. Did you know that the term rickshaw actually came from the Japanese word ‘jinriksha’ which means a ‘man powered vehicle’? Cool, right? Sometime later, I saw one rickshaw tourguide in action. He was talking (comically telling a story in a loud voice) while pulling the rickshaw with two people onboard. I just thought to myself that I can’t bear letting someone  carry my weight, I felt quite sad to think so. I’m weird like that. The photos below include the main gate to the Sensoji Temple, as well as some shots of the Asakusa market.

ELI_1483

ELI_1495

ELI_1496

The Asakusa market is really interesting. Here, you can avail of souvenir items for some friends. I saw a lot of traditional outfits, footwears, fans, foods, decors, etc. In fact, a friend of mine who had been there last year has asked me to buy him the fabric, ninja-like footwear from Asakusa. If I had more time, I would have tried to look for some traditional Japanese pieces. Unfortunately, I did not have so much time to spare so I just took some photos of the crowd (Sorry friend!).

IMG_2236

3. Sensoji Temple

The photos below show the Sensoji Temple. The Pagoda looks cool doesn’t it?

ELI_1513

IMG_2245

For dinner, we headed back to the Shinjuku area to look for some restaurants. We were in the mood for some Sashimi so we went to this small shop near Kabuki-cho. From what I recall, this dinner was the cheapest one that we had (with the exception of McDonald’s Shaka Shaka Chicken, that’s a different story).

Sashimi with Rice (500 Yen)ELI_1536

That concludes my trip to the Tokyo Skytree and Asakusa area. I hope I did not forget to put in the details and I hope some information here can help you in your future travels. More posts about my Japan trip soon!

Credits for the photos: Chen Yu Cheng

The Ghibli Museum: Mitaka, Tokyo

March 16, 2013 § 3 Comments

Image

Studio Ghibli has been famous around the world for its unique and interesting animation and storytelling style. It has produced various animated movies such as: Princess Mononoke, Ponyo On The Cliff By the Sea, My Neighbor Totoro, Howl’s Moving Castle, and it’s award winning film, Spirited Away (the setting of which was inspired by a place called Jiufen in Taiwan). Being from the creative field, I really appreciate watching films from Studio Ghibli because they are inspiring. I am a huge fan of their visual treatment and creative direction. If you’re not familiar with Studio Ghibli or Hayao Miyazaki, allow me to show you a trailer of one of their films. This is from Howl’s Moving Castle, my favorite Ghibli film so far.

Honestly, I didn’t even know that Studio Ghibli has a museum. The idea of visiting the place was  solely my adviser’s. She’s quite cool when it comes to art stuff; I also like her art style. She was also the one who took care of ordering our tickets since it’s difficult to procure. If you’re interested in vising the museum, here’s what you need to know:

1. You cannot purchase the ticket on location, or on the same day. Everything should be booked in advance.

2. If you live abroad, Ghibli has agency partners that can provide tickets. Similarly, it should be ordered in advance because tickets are limited per day.

3. People living in Japan can avail of the tickets in Lawson stores. It’s like their own version of 7-11, Family Mart, or Ministop.

4. The ticket costs 1,000 Yen.

For more info, you can visit their website.

In getting to the location, it actually depends on where you’re coming from. In our case, our hotel was in Shinjuku so we took the JR Chuo line from there. Here’s a more detailed information on how to get to the museum, How to go to Ghibli Museum.

Here are some information about the museum’s operation:

Operating hours: 10:00am – 6:00pm

Closed every Tuesdays.

On the day that we visited, my companions and I had to stay outside the museum for a while because we were too early. Good thing the museum is located inside a park called the Inokashira Park (Inokashirakoen). Since we flew in early March, the spring season was only starting so there were more bare trees that fully blossomed ones. It looked more like fall/winter, actually. Good thing I was able to see some legit fully blossomed Cherry Blossoms (Sakura), but I’ll tell you about that in another post. Here’s are some photos of the park.

Image

Image

Image

Before 10am, there was already a long queue in front of the museum gate. There were a lot of children, as well as young adults, and foreigners. Unfortunately, guests CAN NOT take photos of what’s inside the museum, and I think I know why. It would lose its magic if photos of the place are seen by non-visitors. You really have to see and experience the place for yourself. I actually like the motto of the place printed on their leaflet, it says “Let’s lose our way together”. To me, it’s such a wonderful thing to do. The rule is to get lost in the place (hence, no detailed map) and discover doors, exists, and small things. Being there is like being transported to Ghibli film where everything is magical and interesting. There’s always a place that you want to see and discover. There’s always that staircase or small door that makes you wonder what’s on the other side.

Because I could not take photos inside, I only managed to take photos of the museum’s facade. Here are some of them:

Image

Image

The photo above is a character from the Ghibli film, Laputa, Castle in the Sky. I know it sounds vulgar if you’re familiar with Spanish, but yes, that’s the title. I haven’t watched this film so I was wondering what this character’s name was. My Japanese friend then told me that they merely call them ‘Robot Soldiers’. Personally, I think the character is adorable.

Image

Image

On the leaflet, the photo above is called “Totoro’s Landing”. Image

The structure of the museum itself looks like it’s from one of the Ghibli fims doesn’t it? It’s so amazing.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

 

The photo above is the leaflet (there’s an English version) and a short film ticket with a few animation frames. It’s like a portion of an actual Ghibli film as a remembrance!

So this is the first (of many) post from my trip to Tokyo a few days ago. I hope I can be as detailed as I can in the upcoming ones since I did not do much of the planning on the trip. Looking forward to sharing more new experiences here! ‘Til next time!

Downtown Seoul

August 2, 2011 § Leave a comment


Greetings! This is the last post on my adventures in Seoul series.

Posted below are the photos of the places I have visited in Seoul during the last leg of our stormy stay. First, let’s revisit my beloved Insadong.

How to get there: Take the Subway Orange line (Line 3) to Anguk station. Go to exit 6 and walk straight for about 500 meters.

The first place I like to highlight in Insadong for this post would be Ssamziegil, which is a place rich in art and young pop culture. Imagine big art/vandalism walls and crafts and art shops. I could have posted more photos of the boutiques inside but picture-taking in some of them are prohibited.

Inside Ssamziegil, everything you rest your eyes on would have something written on it. It’s a place where every wall’s a freedom wall. Too bad, I didn’t have a pen with me at that time.

Who’s up for cute Purikura/Photo booths?

My cousin and I just had to have out photos taken here where SNSD’s Sooyoung and Super Junior’s Donghae had a dance sequence for the Seoul Song.

Between Pages Cafe, Ssamziegil

Location: 4th level, Ssamziegil, Insadong

Between Pages Cafe is a perfect place to unleash creativity and just relax. The place’s ambiance is perfect for artists who want to find inspiration and peace from the loud Insadong crowd. What attracted us about this cafe is the fact that We Got Married couple Seohyun and Yonghwa had a date here where they left notes. All customers have access to papers and pens for them to leave posts within the cafe.

Posts and notes everywhere!

Of course, we didn’t leave without making our own notes.

What we ordered: Cafe Americano + Cake of the Day (8,500 KRW)

Going back to Insadong, we saw various shops and food stalls including this one (see photo below). They are selling sweets made of glycerin in a form of hairy strands that cover various flavors of nuts and other flavored goodies. In Insadong alone, I think there were 4-5 shops who sold these. Funny thing though, is their special way of attracting customers. They would randomly call anyone crossing the street and start chanting how they are able to make the sweets.

I seriously could not stop myself from laughing while I was watching them.

Deeper into the smaller alleys connected to Insadong are restaurants that offer various Korean dishes.

Here’s my cousin posing and giving a warm smile after the ahjussi gave her a good discount!

Still in Insadong, we opted to have lunch in a traditional Korean restaurant where people sat on floors and ate on short-legged tables.

What we ordered: Cold soy buckwheat noodles (6,000KRW) and Meat Dumplings (6,000KRW)

After leaving Insadong, my cousin and I thought of exploring Seoul more. The picture below shows the Deoksugung or Deoksu Palace. It’s one of the many grand palaces within Seoul.

Another place that I adored is Hongdae. The place is just so lively and interesting. 

We opted to grab dinner at Chamsaebang where our Korean friends wanted to take us the previous night. We weren’t able to get in because all the tables were full at that time.

How can I resist not having my favorite pajeon? Pajeon is a savory pancake with vegetables and squid.

YES. That’s makkeolli, a Korean rice wine. It’s funny a young Korean couple on a table beside us were looking at us after we ordered this alcoholic drink. I assume they were worried we didn’t know what’s inside it.

Nearby Hongdae (Hongik University Station) are a few interesting cafes one must visit! How about some cute stuff at Hello Kitty Cafe? This ultimately cute and pink cafe will be a nice feast for the eyes for tourists.

1st Shop of Coffee Prince is also located near the Hongdae vicinity.

We stayed and ate at the 2nd shop of Coffee Prince ran by MBC.

What we ordered: Americano + Waffles (5,000 KRW)


The interiors of the shop was splendid. It was relaxing and homey.

We practically took photos on every corner. Good thing we came in early before other tourists arrived.

After a bit of a walk going to Cheonggye Stream, my cousin and I decided to stop at Baskin Robbins for a bit of cold delights.

Seoul Square

Cheonggye Stream/ Cheonggyechon

This stream was reconstructed by the Korean government and turned it into a beautiful park where people can hang out and relax. This spot was also featured in the Seoul song, which is so cool.

Before leaving for the airport, we had to grab an early dinner. Nothing’s more Korean than this: Kimbap and Bibimbap!

This is where my Korea post ends but I hope this won’t be my last post about it. Will I come back? Definitely.

I will also take this opportunity to announce that I will be living in Taiwan for 2 years starting this September so if my succeeding posts will all be in Taiwan, there would be no surprise. Here’s to life!

Mobile Futurists: Epic Korean Cultural Tour

July 22, 2011 § Leave a comment

It has been almost a month since I visited Seoul, Korea. While I do admit that I’m sad about leaving the country after staying for a few days, I also feel happy and blessed to have been able to experience it. If you’ve been reading my previous posts, you must have noticed that I divided them into portions because I don’t like making lengthy posts.

I especially made this post for what is for me the best part of my stay in Korea, meeting the Mobile Futurists. From my previous post, I have mentioned meeting them in Insadong. A cute girl named Sunny approached us and asked us if my cousin and I were foreigners and if we have plans for the weekend. At first, we had to turn her down because it’s the very same day of our flight back home in Manila.

And so we parted ways.

After a while my cousin and I realized that if they were to give us the tour that very day, we’d oblige to go with them. We scoured the long street of Insadong to look for students in red shirts. After finding them, we came to an agreement to have the tour that very moment. We started off by passing by the Coffee Alley which I already featured from my Seoul, Korea post a few days back. After a few photos, we headed off to Bukchon Hanok Village. This place is very nice because it shows how well preserved ancient houses are in Korea.

Bukchon Hanok Village

These are called “kiwajib”, meaning tile-roofed house.

Korea’s 1950’s street

Museum of Korea

This is where ancient tools, clothes, and other culturally significant materials are showcased. Below you can find clay pots where they prepare their famous kimchi; as well as their traditional hanbok and bed.

Walking to King Sejong’s statue at King Sejong Square.

Did you know?

King Sejong is responsible for Korea’s system of writing popularly known as Hangul.

Gyeongbok Palace’s magnificent facade.

After a few hours of walking, the M.F. guys decided to take us at the Olleh Square where they bought us coffee. Such sweet people! Another cool thing about visiting the place is the fact that we saw Olleh’s CEO. Olleh is one of Korea’s telecom companies.

Before parting ways, the M.F. guys gave us a “thank you” present for joining their tour. I was very happy getting a remembrance from them. 

Because we had so much fun with Sunny, Rene, Jake, Martin and Jinny, we decided to go out again, this time, just to hang out and have fun! They decided to take us to Hongdae, a buzzling spot for the fun-seeking youth of Seoul.

Jake-oppa showing off his card trick skills, which in the end turned out to be a funny gag.

In Korean culture, it’s considered proper to have both hands holding a cup whenever someone is pouring a drink.

This is a very delicious Chimdak.

Cheers! Konbe!

This is a traditional Korean rice wine called makkeolli. It fits so well with spicy foods!

What does it taste like? I say it’s something like the taste of beer.

The effects of the makkeolli is this:

After we had our dinner, they invited us to sing in a noreabang, a Korean term for a karaoke room.

They prepared this video of our tour. It was indeed a lot of fun watching it and reliving the moments.

youtube

Even though our stay in Korea and our time with the Mobile Futurists  was short, it was a truly memorable time. Having met them during the trip made our Seoul experience all the more fun and exciting. Good food, nice sceneries are some of the wonderful things Seoul has to offer but the people we met and shared time with, are definitely worth coming back for.

Thank you to the Mobile Futurists: Sunny, Rene, Jake, Martin and Jinny, for sharing your time with us. Konbe!

Credits to the Mobile Futurists (Sunny, Rene, Jake, Martin, and Jinny) for all the videos. Thank you for allowing me to share them here in my blog. Kamsahamnida!

Foodtrip: Korean Snacks

July 15, 2011 § Leave a comment

One of the best things about going to a different place is the experience of trying a different culture and cuisine.

For this short post, I am going to feature a few of the snacks I have tried while I was in Seoul. As we were touring, our Korean friends suggested a Ttukbokki (Spicy Rice Cakes) place for us to try. We also tried Sundae (Noodles stuffed in pig intestines- think of isaw) and Tigim (Fried stuff- includes squid and sweet potatoes).

Our friends suggested for us to try this drink, a Rice Juice Drink. It was refreshing!

I would like to thank Sunny, Rene, Martin, Jake and Jinny for allowing me to share this video to my subscribers. I love you guys!

Please watch out for the rest of my travel posts about Korea. Thank you!

Naminara Republic : Winter Sonata

July 13, 2011 § 4 Comments

Naminara Republic/ Nami Island became widely known by tourists because of the Korean drama, Winter Sonata. Although I personally haven’t watched the show, I still wanted to visit the place because of the relaxing scenery. My cousin and I purchased a package tour to Nami at Insadong,Seoul.

Tour Fee: 21,000 KRW

Package Inclusion: (Roundtrip)

1.)Bus fare from Tapgol Park,Seoul to Nami Wharf

2.)Ferry fare from Nami Wharf to Nami Island

My favorite spot would have to be the Sequoia Lane. The perfectly lined trees is such a good place to take photos.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the Travels category at .

%d bloggers like this: